Archives for January 2014

Facebook Began Rolling Out Its New Trending Feature.

Facebook began rolling out its new trending feature, designed to surface relevant conversations and it’s not using Twitter-style hashtags to organize them.

Facebook-Trending-Topic

The list, called Trending, will appear near the top of the right-hand column of the news feed for desktop users. Desktop users in the U.S., U.K., Canada, India, and Australia will begin seeing the new Trending box on the top right side of the homepage. Denoted by squiggly blue arrows, the topics range from people (Bruce Springsteen, Rex Ryan) to events (Academy Awards, Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show) to places (J.C. Penney).

“The list is personalized, including topics based on things you’re interested in and what is trending across Facebook overall,” Chris Struhar, a Facebook engineering manager, said in a statement. You can click on any headline to see the most interesting posts from your friends or Pages that are talking about that particular topic.”

Mr. Struhar said, trending is just one piece in Facebook’s larger strategy. “Our vision for news feed is to become your personal newspaper we want to connect you with all the events in the world that you will want to know about.”

 

DuckDuckGo- A Private Search Engine Answered 1Billion Queries in 2013

According to a blogpost, DuckDuckGO, the search engine that doesn’t collect or share any of your personal information, processed a record of 1 billion searches in 2013.

DuckDuckGo reported that on January7, they had fielded more than 4.5 million search requests within 24 hours. However, this doesn’t exactly mean that DuckDuckGo will be a contender to companies like Google anytime soon. Google reportedly fielded something like 2 trillion search queries in 2013 alone.

DuckDuckGo

Unlike Google, DuckDuckGo will never store historical search data or inundate you with targeted ads. Much like T-Mobile, the search engine’s spirited message convinced a great deal of users to rethink what they had been told was the status quo.

“People are making major changes in their online habits and looking for ways to protect their private information from US government surveillance” said chief executive Robert Beens.

 

Pinterest-Bought A Visual Search Startup

Pinterest recently acquired VisualGraph, a company that develops object recognition technology. This recent purchase of VisualGraph makes apparent that Pinterest want to leverage its 70 million users and associated pins to better serve the users who are searching Pinterest for topic-specific images.

With image recognition, Pinterest can go one step further and help algorithmically group images based on machine code, instead of having to rely on users pinning the two images together under a single banner. VisualGraph could help optimize the serving of relevant Pinterest ads without the need to collect endless image meta data.

Visual-Graph

Google may be a tough opponent for Pinterest-still Google currently does a pretty good job with their image search, one thing their results lack is an association with a large image based community. Pinterest’s defining feature may give the social media site an edge in the image-search game.

 

Twitter Launches Jelly-A New Question and Answer Based Search Engine

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone announced the first details of his new venture Jelly, a question and answer based search engine for iOS and Android.

In a description of Jelly featured on the startup’s website, the company says using Jelly is a more fun way to search for topics or images. It’s an app that lets you ask questions, push them out to your network, and get rapid responses. “If you have a question, there’s someone out there that knows the answer,” Stone says in a video accompanying the official blog post.

Jelly

The app aims to capitalize on the popularity of mobile smartphones and the pervasiveness of social networks. The app is also meant to personalize the search experience—it might take more inspiration from Quora, a community-based question-and-answer site, than from Google or Bing.

Facebook is working on its own new search tool, called Graph search, which is meant to answer people’s questions based on information about their friends. And Microsoft’s Bing search engine already incorporates data from Facebook and Twitter into its search results to give users more context. And though it is not meant to be “social,” Google offers its Goggles search tool on mobile devices, which aims to answer questions based on photos. What Jelly will be doing differently is that it will tap into new algorithms to help target the questions to specific networks, specifically using images. Jelly is placing a bet on the altruistic side of human nature.

The app is available now for iOS and Android.